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Design

These striking tiny ceramic sculptures feel larger than life!

We’ve covered ceramic artwork before on DesignFaves and we’re constantly amazed by its versatility an art medium. Ceramic artist Jon Almeda creates miniature ceramic sculptures by hand on a miniature clay wheel. They’re incredibly detailed. From cups to vases, bowls, and more, Almeda’s sculptures can easily sit on a coin. The artist is constantly raising the bar for himself because now he’s making 1/12th replicas of a kiln and ceramic wheel for use in architectural models. Check out some of his miniature sculptures below and follow him on Instagram for more! Source Lees verder

Design

Art installation of raining condoms graze Kaohsiung street

Luzinterruptus, an anonymous artistic group known for their controversial art installations, has done it again in one of Taiwan’s cities. Their recent project involves 2,500 illuminated condoms filled with glowing water suspended in the air to mimic drops of rain. The installation can be found on a Kaohsiung street and is fully interactive. Visitors can walk through the grid of blue-colored droplets that produce the feeling of being frozen in time under the rain. The inspiration behind the interactive canopy is drawn from Taiwan’s increasing droughts. “Rain Interactive” successfully does this through the uncanny participation of the condom and Asian’s taboo perspective of it. The project is located in Kaohsiung and was finished in 14 days with the help of more than 20 volunteers. Source Lees verder

Design

3D landscapes assembled from picturesque postcards

Using old postcards, Caterina Rossato has created a series of unique, layered 3-D images. In ‘Deja Vu,’ Rossato cuts up dozens of postcards from a variety of different scenic locations in the world and layers them together to create new imaginary places. “The déjà vu is a psychic phenomenon which is part of the forms of alteration of memories (paramnesie): it consists in the erroneous sensation of having seen an image or of having lived previously an event or a situation that is occurring. Although improperly, it is also called ‘false recognition.’,” Rossato explains. For more of Rossato’s work, visit her website. Source Lees verder

Design

Animated music video takes place in a fabulous moving penny arcade

Music videos are getting more and more creative by the day. This one for Jane Bordeaux’s “Ma’agalim” is just great! The music video takes you into an old penny arcade, with a moving landscape inside, featuring whimsical characters that act as visual lyrics to the folk country trio’s new song. The music video features breathtaking pops of color and detail. The animated short’s director, Uri Lotan, previously worked for Pixar and Disney. Watch the music video below, and access the short’s full credits here. Click here to view the embedded video. Source Lees verder

Design

Photos play with colors and arranged common objects

Italian designer Benedetto Demaio is a self-described “designer by vocation, photographer for leisure, and teacher for the mission.” His Instagram account @benedettodemaio is an experiment of colors, both natural and unnatural, of common household objects arranged and recolored in unusual ways to make them pop as loudly as possible. Demaio’s knack for capturing colors and mundane objects in exciting new ways goes to show how a little more imagination and effort can bring a fresh perspective on such banal things. Make sure to follow his Instagram for more snippets of colorful escapism. Source Lees verder

Design

‘Vertical Forest’ architecture improves the urban environment

The vertical forest is a design for “metropolitan reforestation” by Boeri Studio’s architects, Stefano Boeri, Gianandrea Barreca, and Giovanni La Varra. Sited for Milan, Italy which has high air pollution, the planted greenery will help to support the area’s environment. However, in addition to supporting the city, the vertical forest also creates a microclimate within the building, providing better air quality for the interior spaces. Boeri explains, “The diversity of the plants and their characteristics produce humidity, absorb CO2 and dust particles, producing oxygen and protect from radiation and acoustic pollution, improving the quality of living spaces and saving energy.” In addition to air quality, the irrigation of the plant-life is efficiently engineered using greywater which is recycled waste-water from sinks and other sources. Source Lees verder

Design

This new dessert blurs the lines of liquid and solid. How do you eat that?

If this was put on my plate I’m not sure I would know what to do. Can I eat it? Do I drink it? Can I even touch it? We all might be prone to marvel at it for a while, but don’t wait. This delicacy is only available for a limited time… 30 minutes, then it’s just a puddle. Okay, what is this thing? It’s a Japanese delicacy created by the Kineseiken Sieka Company called a Mizu Shingen Mochi. Most Shingen Mochis are a yellow rice cake served as dessert with brown sugar syrup and soybean powder. The Mizu is made of water (go figure…) sourced from a coveted spring in the Southern Japanese Alps. I don’t know how they do it, and maybe that’s the point, but eaters have described the taste as instilled with “natural sweetness” and the texture as “delightfully soft.” Unfortunately Kinesieken Sieka literally has some sort of patent on this thing, so if you’re intrigued and want a taste for yourself you may be in for a long ride. Source Lees verder

Design

Playful images merge reality and fiction

Always playful, often inspirational, Ben Heine’s “PENCIL VS CAMERA” series merges reality and imagination. By overlaying black and white pencil sketches atop photographs, Heine is able to add a personal twist to each real-life setting. Inversely, with larger work, Heine inserts individuals, often himself, into the drawings. This Brussels-based artist’s care to create cohesive alignments and perspectives within his images contributes to the convincing-ness of his visual narrations. Heine often includes his hand in each image, connecting the artist to the work, as well as the viewer. In one exhibition, Heine set a giant illustration, featuring himself snapping a picture, on the floor so that viewers could sit down and take their own photos of Heine’s self-portrait taking their portrait. Source Lees verder

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